The Assassin’s Creed Origins DLC Where You Fight Giant Scorpions Has Been Delayed

The Curse of the Pharaohs, the second and final expansion for Assassin’s Creed: Origins, is not going to launch on time. Ubisoft announced today that the expansion has been delayed by a week, shifting from March 6 to March 13.

A spokesperson for Ubisoft told GameSpot that the delay was necessary so as to “deliver the best experience possible to our players.”

The expansion is included in Origins’ $20 season pass or as a separate purchase on PC, Xbox One, and PlayStation 4. Before its release, everyone will be able to take part in an introductory quest called Lights Among the Dunes, which will be added as part of a free Origins update on February 27. It is unclear if this date is still accurate given the delay for The Curse of the Pharaohs, but we’ve followed up with Ubisoft to try to find out.

The Curse of the Pharaohs adds completely new locations, including Aaru, which is the heaven-like paradise filled with beautiful reed fields…and giant scorpions. Players will also face off against an undead Nefertiti in a boss battle of sorts.

The Curse of the Pharaohs differs from previous DLC, The Hidden Ones, in that it introduces a totally new storyline that is separate from that of the main game. You’ll take on a variety of Egyptian beasts and famous pharaohs as you try to figure out why the dead are being brought back to life. In addition to the new areas, story, and enemies, you’ll be able to acquire new outfits, gear, and weapons. Furthermore, it raises the level cap to 55.

This DLC comes not long after the release of Discovery Tour, a free update that allows you to play through the game without any quests or combat. It effectively transforms the game into a learning experience as you’re able to explore ancient Egypt and even take part in guided tours that will teach you about the world. If you’d prefer something different, Ubisoft has also released a New Game Plus mode for Origins.

from GameSpot https://www.gamespot.com/articles/the-assassins-creed-origins-dlc-where-you-fight-gi/1100-6456955/

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See Some Of Assassin’s Creed Origins’ Intense New Curse Of The Pharaohs DLC Fights in 4K

Following the release of its first DLC pack, The Hidden Ones, another Assassin’s Creed Origins DLC is on the way, this one called The Curse of the Pharaohs. With its launch on PS4, Xbox One, and PC drawing near, we recently got to check it out.

In the video above, you can see about half an hour of gameplay from two different main story missions. These feature totally new locations you won’t have ventured through previously, and they’re home to some notable encounters. Those include one with some giant scorpions and a boss fight against an undead Nefertiti.

The Curse of the Pharaohs differs from The Hidden Ones in that it introduces a totally new storyline that is separate from that of the main game. You’ll take on a variety of Egyptian beasts and famous pharaohs as you try to figure out why the dead are being brought back to life. In addition to the new areas, story, and enemies, you’ll be able to acquire new outfits, gear, and weapons. Furthermore, it raises the level cap to 55.

Curse of the Pharaohs is due out on March 6 and is included in the $20 season pass or as a separate purchase. Before its release, everyone will be able to take part in an introductory quest called Lights Among the Dunes, which will be added as part of a free Origins update on February 27.

This DLC comes not long after the release of Discovery Tour, a free update that allows you to play through the game without any quests or combat. It effectively transforms the game into a learning experience as you’re able to explore ancient Egypt and even take part in guided tours that will teach you about the world. If you’d prefer something different, Ubisoft has also released a New Game Plus mode for Origins.

from GameSpot https://www.gamespot.com/articles/see-some-of-assassins-creed-origins-intense-new-cu/1100-6456952/

Kingdom Come And The Importance Of First Impressions

At first glance, Kingdom Come: Deliverance bears more than a passing resemblance to other medieval RPGs, particularly the Elder Scrolls series. Both share a first-person viewpoint and take place in a sprawling, European-inspired world inhabited by an extensive cast of characters going about their daily lives. Beyond those superficial similarities, however, Kingdom Come is an entirely different experience, carving out its own identity by removing fantasy elements entirely in favor of a historically accurate setting and gameplay.

Where most other medieval RPGs populate their worlds with magic and dragons, Kingdom Come eschews all of the fantasy trappings typically associated with the genre for a story that’s firmly rooted in history. The game takes place in 15th century Bohemia, with players assuming the role of a lowly blacksmith’s son as the country becomes embroiled in a brutal civil war. This emphasis on realism extends into the gameplay systems; combat has a steep learning curve, and you must learn how to bandage up wounds to keep from bleeding out if you happen to get struck by an arrow.

Unfortunately, as is often the case with such ambitious titles, Kingdom Come is also burdened by its share of bugs, which will undoubtedly turn some players away. In the video above, GameSpot’s Peter Brown, Jean-Luc Seipke, and Rob Handlery discuss their experience with the title, particularly their initial impressions and how, despite its many technical issues, they eventually came around on the game after spending more time with it.

Kingdom Come is available now for PS4, Xbox One, and PC. Critic Brett Todd called it “a rewarding, one-of-a-kind game” in GameSpot’s Kingdom Come review. “It’s an impressive and unflinching look at the medieval era that transports you inside the compelling story of a real person caught in the middle of a civil war. As such, this is one of those rare, memorable games that stays with you long after you stop playing,” he wrote.

If you’re interested in seeing more footage from the medieval RPG, you can watch us play through the opening portion of Kingdom Come, giving you a look at how the tutorial unfolds, along with a glimpse at the game’s demanding combat system. You can also watch footage of us fleeing from a band of attackers on horseback and learning how to use a sword and bow for the first time.

from GameSpot https://www.gamespot.com/articles/kingdom-come-and-the-importance-of-first-impressio/1100-6456917/

What You Need To Know About Ex Machina Director’s New Film, Annihilation

Between Arrival, Blade Runner 2049, and Altered Carbon, we’ve had a pretty good run of science fiction entertainment over the last few years. One of the most memorable modern sci-fi movies is Ex Machina, written and directed by Alex Garland. Three years after its release, Garland’s next movie, Annihilation, is gearing up for release, and it looks to be just as ambitious.

Based on the novel of the same name, Annihilation follows a biologist, an anthropologist, a psychologist, a surveyor, and a linguist as they investigate a strange, uncharted stretch of land. What they find there, however, promises to take viewers on a mild-melting sci-fi journey.

Garland, who video game fans may also know for his work on Enslaved: Odyssey to the West and DmC: Devil May Cry, recently visited the GameSpot offices and sat down with us to discuss his film, specifically the approach to adapting the book for the big screen, and what attracted him to the story.

On top of that, he also takes the time to address a controversy surround the movie’s production relating to the whitewashing of a character. Garland discusses his feelings on the issue of whitewashing as a whole and the issue as it pertains to his movie. There’s also a chat about the rise of Netflix as a distribution service for movies, and how it fits into the type of entertainment he makes and we consume.

from GameSpot https://www.gamespot.com/articles/what-you-need-to-know-about-ex-machina-directors-n/1100-6456966/

Every Netflix Original Movie Released In 2018 So Far

Netflix may be primarily known for its award-winning series, but the streaming service also provides quite a few movies that are worth your time. The streaming giant puts out more original movies than any of us realized, but don’t worry, we will have you up to date with everything coming to a streaming device near you.

Starting with January, we’re highlighting every Netflix original movie the company releases this year–as well as a few notable ones Netflix didn’t produce but has distribution rights to–and including a few of our thoughts about the shows we’ve seen. Here are the original movies you can currently watch on Netflix, right now.

If you’re more interested in the company’s original shows, check out every Netflix original series for 2018.

Click here to jump to February’s releases

The Polka King

Release Date: January 12

Genre: Comedy/Drama

Based on a true story, The Polka King follows Jan Lewan (Jack Black), a polka band leader who was imprisoned in the mid-’00s for running a Ponzi scheme.

The Polka King is pretty mediocre. At times, it can be funny, but its appeal seems to be to people that find Polka either the worst or best music genre of all time, even though it’s not the primary focus of the story. It’s a letdown as the real-life story the movie is based on is fascinating.

Step Sisters

Release Date: January 18

Genre: Comedy

Megalyn Echikunwoke (Arrow, Vixen) plays a Harvard Law student helps a sorority win a step dance championship by teaching them to step.

The Open House

Release Date: January 19

Genre: Horror

A mother and her teenage son move into a secluded mansion in the mountains. They find someone else is at the house as well–someone who wants to harm them.

Blockbuster

Release Date: January 24

Genre: Romantic Comedy

After being dumped by his girlfriend, a man devices a plan to get back his girlfriend, Lola, who loves superheroes.

A Futile and Stupid Gesture

Release Date: January 26

Genre: Comedy

Based on a true story, A Futile and Stupid Gesture follows comedy writer Doug Kenny (Will Forte), the mind behind National Lampoon magazine.

The Cloverfield Paradox

Release Date: February 4

Genre: Sci-Fi/Horror

The Earth is in crisis and a group of the brightest scientists heads to space in order to test technology that could provide the planet with infinite power. However, the tech creates a paradox which has some unwanted effects.

GameSpot’s Mike Rougeau said in his review, “By the time The Cloverfield Paradox limps lamely to its nonsensical yet somehow predictable conclusion, you’ll probably already have stopped paying attention.”

The Ritual

Release Date: February 9

Genre: Horror

A group of friends reunites and takes a trip to Sweden where they hike through a national park. They find a menacing creature stalking them throughout their journey.

Note: Netflix is the international distributor for this movie.

Seeing Allred

Release Date: February 9

Genre: Documentary

Seeing Allred follows women’s rights attorney Gloria Allred–who has devoted four decades to her work–as her life is chronicled, and she takes on powerful men accused of sexual assault.

When We First Met

Release Date: February 9

Genre: Comedy

At her engagement party, Avery Martin (Alexandra Daddario) recalls the first time she met her fiance Noah Ashby (Adam DeVine) at a Halloween party.

Love Per Square Foot

Release Date: February 14

Genre: Romantic Comedy

The Hindi-language movie follows a young man and woman searching for a house in Mumbai.

Irreplaceable You

Release Date: February 16

Genre: Drama

Irreplaceable You follows an engaged couple, Abbie and Sam, who have been best friends since childhood. Abbie learns she has terminal cancer and tries to find someone to replace her in Sam’s life.

Fullmetal Alchemist

Release Date: February 19

Genre: Live-Action Anime

In a world where alchemy is real, two brothers go on a quest for the Philosopher’s Stone, after failing to revive their dead mother.

GameSpot’s Mike Rougeau said in his review, “Despite its high profile and fan hunger, Fullmetal Alchemist is everything wrong with live-action anime adaptations. It both adds nothing to the original and does a poor job imitating it.”

Note: Netflix is the international distributor for this movie.

Mute

Release Date: February 23

Genre: Sci-Fi

40 years in the future, a mute bartender searches for his missing girlfriend. The director Duncan Jones has called this a spiritual sequel to his 2009 film Moon.

GameSpot’s Mike Rougeau said in his review, “Mute is a bad joke about itself, the movie version of a Weird Al Yankovic song (an “Amish Paradise” sequel set in the future?), only if the filmmaker wasn’t aware it was supposed to be a parody.”

from GameSpot https://www.gamespot.com/gallery/every-netflix-original-movie-released-in-2018-so-f/2900-1843/

Guillermo Del Toro’s 12 Greatest Movie Monsters

Guillermo Del Toro is one of fantasy cinema’s great modern directors. From acclaimed Spanish language movies such as The Devil’s Backbone and Pan’s Labyrinth to high profile Hollywood blockbusters like Pacific Rim and Hellboy films, Del Toro’s gift for imaginative, exciting, scary, and often deeply moving cinema is unrivalled. He’s also delivered some of the most memorable monsters of recent times too. By tapping into the great tradition of movie creatures that goes back to the likes of Frankenstein and Creature From the Black Lagoon, Del Toro has ensured that his creations are a vital part of his storytelling and frequently unlike anything we’ve seen on screen before.

His latest movie, The Shape of Water, is another masterpiece. Part period drama, part sci-fi thriller, part offbeat love story, it features another fantastic monster creation, played by the director’s regular creature collaborator, Doug Jones. So with the film nominated for 13 awards at the upcoming Oscars, let’s take a look at some of the other amazing monster creations in Del Toro’s filmography.

12. Cathedral-Head (Hellboy II: The Golden Army, 2008)

Hellboy II is packed with weird and wonderful monstrous creations; so many that some of the best are on screen only fleetingly. Cathedral-Head is one of Del Toro’s most hilariously odd creatures. He runs a map shop in the Troll Market, and yes, has a cathedral for a head. Del Toro originally planned an even more lavish design for this creation: “Originally the idea was to have little humans running around the ramparts,” he said. “But the budget wouldn’t allow it.”

11. Karl Ruprecht Kroenen (Hellboy, 2004)

Although Kroenen appeared in Mike Mingola’s Hellboy comics, he was dramatically reworked by Del Toro into the one of the first movie’s main bad guys. On the page he’s just a scientist in a gasmask, but on screen he became–to use Del Toro’s words–a “mechanical clockwork Nazi zombie.” We approve.

10. The Last Elemental (Hellboy II: The Golden Army, 2008)

One of Del Toro’s greatest skills is his ability to make his monsters more than just weird and scary. He frequently treats them as he does his human characters, giving them personalities and even making them sympathetic and relatable. Hellboy II‘s Last Elemental is a great example. Despite its destructive nature, this gigantic tree god is the last of its kind, and Hellboy’s decision to kill it is a haunting, tragic moment.

9. Ghosts (Crimson Peak, 2015)

Crimson Peak is Del Toro’s least-loved movie. It was a box office failure, and was met by mixed reviews from critics who found the mix of gore, scares, humor, and gothic romance a little uneven. But there is much to like, including the gruesome ghosts which haunt the movie’s Gothic mansion. These bloody phantoms are both visceral and otherworldly, their high-contrast red design a world away from more familiar cinematic spectres.

8. Behemoth (Hellboy, 2004)

This terrifying tentacled beast is perhaps as close as we’ll get to seeing what Del Toro would have done if he’d had the chance to direct his passion project, At the Mountains of Madness. Sadly that H.P. Lovecraft adaptation never happened, but we do have the Behemoth. One of the 369 children of the demonic entities known as the Ogdru Jahad, it was inspired by the interdimensional horrors of Lovecraft’s stories, and made its appearance in Hellboy by bursting out of the body of Hellboy’s nemesis Rasputin.

7. Trespasser (Pacific Rim, 2013)

Pacific Rim is packed with cool kaiju, but none have quite the initial onscreen impact as the Trespasser. It’s the first creature we see, and this towering beast–also known as Axehead–gives us the perfect introduction to the destructive power of the kaiju. Trespasser lays waste to San Francisco, and because he pre-dates the Jaegers, lives to fight another day.

6. Faun (Pan’s Labyrinth, 2006)

This goat-like creature was played by Doug Jones and formed a major part of Pan’s Labyrinth‘s poster campaign. He towers above Ofelia as he leads her into the labyrinth and. despite Del Toro’s insistence that the Faun is “neither good or evil,” there is a strong suggestion that he harbours unhealthy desires for the young girl.

5. Reapers (Blade 2, 2002)

With Del Toro in charge of the second Blade movie, he made sure that his vampires were way more memorable than those in its predecessor. The Reapers are genetically enhanced bloodsuckers with three-part jaws that split their heads wide open, to allow a proboscis-like tongue to hoover up their victim’s blood. Tasty.

4. Judas Breed (Mimic, 1997)

Del Toro may not have had a happy experience directing his English-language debut Mimic, but the movie did deliver one of his scariest monsters. The Judas Breed are huge, human-hunting mutant termite/mantis hybrids that can imitate people by folding their wings and arms, shortly before they rip your head off.

3. The Angel of Death (Hellboy II: The Golden Army, 2008)

Played by Doug Jones once more, this demonic, grinning figure holds Hellboy’s fate in her hands in a key scene towards the end of Hellboy II. Like Pan’s Labyrinth‘s Pale Man, the Angel’s eyes are located elsewhere on her body–in this case on her wings–with the top-half of her head replaced by a weird cracked organic disc. Or something.

2. Otachi (Pacific Rim, 2013)

Otachi is the meanest, deadliest, an coolest of all Pacific Rim‘s kaiju. She spits gallons of Jaeger-melting neon acid, can fly, has a lethal barbed tail, and just keeps on fighting. And, as we discover when she is finally stopped by Gipsy Danger, she did all this while pregnant!

1. Pale Man (Pan’s Labyrinth, 2006)

Perhaps the most iconic and terrifying monster in Del Toro’s filmography, the Pale Man is the child-eating humanoid creature that Ofelia must face in Pan’s Labyrinth. Played, of course, by Doug Jones, the moment in which this creature places his eyeball-hands on his face remains a classic, unforgettably chilling moment.

from GameSpot https://www.gamespot.com/gallery/guillermo-del-toros-12-greatest-movie-monsters/2900-1846/